IFAS | Freedom Writer | November 1994 | wordspics.html

Road to Victory in words and pictures


Pat Robertson addressed the more than 3,000 activists in attendance at the Christian Coalition's 1994 Road to Victory conference. This year's conference was the largest in the five-year history of the Coalition. At the close of the event, the newly trained activists left the Washington Hilton to participate in political campaigns back home. Watch for them in a precinct near you.


With a message geared to an ultraconservative Christian audience, Dan Quayle brought down the house in a speech that was interrupted dozens of times by applause and standing ovations. Later, fans mobbed the former U.S. vice-president seeking autographs for Quayle's book, Standing Firm.


"I have done over 70 Christian Coalition Informational Meetings in the last 18 months and David Barton's Products have been invaluable in furthering the principals [sic] behind Christian Coalition in San Diego."
Display at the WallBuilders booth at Road to Victory

David Barton, author of The Myth of Separation, a book that denies the separation between church and state, presented an abbreviated version of his slide show on establishing biblical law. Barton referred to Quaker minister William Penn, who, in 1681 received a land grant giving him the land between New York and Maryland. At the time, Penn said that God gave him the land and that God would "make it the seed of a nation." A year later Penn drafted the "Frame of Government" for the new territory that would become Pennsylvania. Penn wrote, "Make and establish such laws as shall best preserve true Christian and civil liberty, in all opposition to unchristian practices." In other words, said Barton, the basis of our laws should be: "Whatever is Christian is legal. Whatever isn't Christian is illegal."


New York Coalition elects candidates

Jeff Baran, a former anti-abortion activist, is the state director of the New York Christian Coalition. The New York Christian Coalition takes credit for electing conservatives to school boards in 10 of 32 school districts in New York City in 1993. The group distributed approximately 500,000 voter guides through about 1,000 churches in New York's five boroughs. This was done in cooperation with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. A Christian Coalition of New York internal memorandum dated December 31, 1992 presented some of the group's goals for 1993. Topping the list was: "Finding quality candidates for school board seats and then getting them elected." According to the IRS tax code, non-profit organizations cannot endorse or oppose candidates. Hmmm.


Pierre Bynum: Death penalty for abortionists

Rev. Pierre Bynum heads Capitol Hill Prayer Alert ministries, based in Washington, DC. "The reason we are pro-lifers is because we are for God's law," Bynum told The Freedom Writer. "I believe that there should be laws that bring sanctions on abortionists," he continued. "There should be very, very extreme punishments for abortionists I believe abortion is murder but that has to be done through law." Bynum believes abortion is a capital offense, and, according to the Bible, is punishable by the death penalty. Concerning gays, Bynum said, "If God said that homosexuality is so abominable to Me, so destructive to society, that I have declared that it is a capital offense, then that should be reflected in our law."


What's up with Wildmon?

The Rev. Donald Wildmon, head of the American Family Association, spoke on "Hollywood's Attack on Traditional Values." Before its premier in 1993, Wildmon launched the attack against the award-winning TV show "NYPD Blue." He opposes the program "because of the pornography, obscene language, and graphic violence." One wonders how he knows this. During his presentation, Wildmon said he never watches network TV.


Communications technology

ACTS (Advanced Communication Technology & Services) allows Christian Coalition chapters to communicate urgent messages to all its members concerning pending legislation. At the end of the recorded message, the person receiving the call is invited to "press 1," and is immediately connected with the office of their elected representative.


Getting involved in the party of your choice

The Republican gathering was packed. Somewhat less well-attended was the Democratic meeting, held in this sparely furnished room.

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