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Organizing Advice, pp 241-252



1  Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (New York: Vintage Books, 1979).

2  Matthew J. Mancini, One Dies, Get Another: Convict Leasing in the American South, 1866-1928 (Columbia, S.C.: South Carolina Press, 1996).

3  Estelle B. Freedman, Their Sisters' Keepers: An Historical Perspective on Female Correctional Institutions in the United States: 1870-1900, 2 FEMINIST STUD. 77, 77 (1974).

4  Id. See also, Kathryn Watterson, WOMEN IN PRISON: INSIDE THE CONCRETE WOMB 194-199 (rev. ed. 1996) (documenting how the work of reformists concerned with the sexual and physical abuse of women in co-ed prisons eventually led to the creation of multiple federal and state prisons ad county jails for women).

5  See, e.g., Cynthia Chandler, Death and Dying in America: The Prison Industrial Complex's Impact on Women's Health, 18 BERKELEY WOMEN'S L.J 40 (2003) (documenting abuses throughout the women's prison system and their connection to the broader goals of the prison industrial complex).

6  See Angela Y. Davis & Dylan Rodriguez, The Challenge of Prison Abolition: A Conversation, 27 SOCIAL JUSTICE 212 (2000) (providing a more detailed analysis of how reformist efforts have helped to strengthen and expand the prison industrial complex, and the contrast between prison reform versus prison abolition); see also Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Globalization and US Prison Growth: From Military Keynesianism to Post-Keynesian Militarism, RACE & CLASS, Oct. 1998-Mar. 1999, at 183, 172-73.

7  Cynthia Chandler, Death and Dying in America: The Prison Industrial Complex's Impact on Women's Health, 18 BERKELEY WOMEN'S L.J 40 (2003) citing Angela Y. Davis & Dylan Rodriguez, The Challenge of Prison Abolition: A Conversation, 27 SOCIAL JUSTICE 212, 202 (2000) (arguing that "the theories [of prison reform] of well-intentioned women and humanitarians in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries ultimately resulted in a plan of imprisonment [that was] so inhumane and ineffective," and "reformers with good intent often weren't able to anticipate the effect of their actions").

8  See Angela Y. Davis & Dylan Rodriguez, The Challenge of Prison Abolition: A Conversation, 27 SOCIAL JUSTICE 212, 202 (2000) (arguing that "prison reforms and prison 'progress' seem to have a cyclical and regressive nature").

9  See California SB 278 (2003).

10  See California AB 1946 (2004), veto message available at http://www.assembly.ca.gov/acs/acsframeset2text.htm.

11  Communities Against Rape and Abuse, www.cara-seattle.org, SistaIISista www.sistaiisista.org, Generation Five, www.generationfive.org



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